Viral Complexities: Art’s Infective Fissures? -

Hello Blogosphere… I have been abscent for quite some time but now I am back with a horribly erratic and often unfollowable peice of writing. A small essay trying to build a metaphorical understanding for how Art of all kinds (but particularly visual) has a virus like quality. I attempted to create a concept that was useful when trying to imagine our refined cultural practices as not overly valued financially but closer to a biological autonomous event. I am not sure I succeeded and this is a bad essay for sure… read with caution.

Abstract: One has been thinking about artistic events and methods that are potentially ant-capitalist. Throughout the past two decades global culture has been accumulating and translating large changes in culture. Changes that have been driven by a surge in the use of new technology, science’s increased understanding of biology, and societies restless creative growth. This essay describes these changes in the aesthetics of one event. The visual event one labels as an Infective Fissure, an encounter with the radical potentials of the virus we commonly refer to as art. Having tried to both accurately explain this in current visual culture, and philosophically explore this event’s intellectual points of origin. The text features interpretations of the work of Philippe Parreno, Peirre Huyghe, and Joseph Nechvatal (among others). Combining with the writings of: Victor Burgin, Jacques Derrida, Jacques Rancière, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Nick Land, and Hito Steyrel to offer an exploration of an event that one for-sees in many of our artistic experiences today, tomorrow, and the day after. Infective Fissures are events that demand even more aesthetic reflection?

 

Key words: Infective Fissures, Events, Aesthetics, Politics, Techno-capital,

 

Cybernetics, Virology, and Art. (word count: 5515)

 

Viral Complexities: Art’s Old Medicine.

In the description of his personal project the video loop, ‘Virtual Amplification’ (2011). Edgor Kraft has written down an interesting sentence, ‘Each new mouse click takes us away from an answer and question just as each following step of developments of the media environment and virtualisation moves us further from the understanding of what is an authentic realityi.’ Such a sentence incubates and galvanizes contemporary thinking around new forms in art’s production and consumption. Kraft’s work immediately illustrates what one wants to articulate. One finds that the circular narrative of this video loop evokes the symmetry/asymmetry, inside/outside, of life. Post-web 1.0 an internet that was also referred to as an ‘information portal’, an environment that one could only read from. However we are now interacting with a newer version and are awaiting it’s next evolution. Art has been affected by these movement’s and we have witnessed large amounts of creativity. That use new digital media in the world of data, software, and networked communication. In the middle of all this is the potential for a unique event. A development which brings together technology and biology to invite new ways of thinking about the future of art? This writing seeks to outline, define, and persuade the reader of the importance of these new radically viral aesthetics.

In the essay ‘Recycled Electrons’ George Boole, an academic and logician, recollects his first encounter with the internetii. He says that, ‘the globe’s time and space had been instantly redrawn’ and that, ‘it’s trunk/branch/twig structure is an underlying framework that has become part of our very mode of thought’. If this is true then one believes new media art is virally complex precisely because it now serves as an ‘underlying framework’ for critical insight on arts place within capitalism. Another way of articulating this is that NMA is for today’s ‘art world’ what Karl Marx saw as the Proletariat (the workers), the first and only class. Suggesting a naive reality whereby new media artists have spawned a revolution, and the means of production the ownership of markets and wealth. Is as the internet should compel, equally redistributed amongst a community. Staying with the Marxist terminology in addition to Kraft’s and Boole’s word’s, the viral impact of media can be practically explored. Just observe the fact that in 2008 the online community Anonymous in reaction to the treatment of Wikileaks, disrupted and nullified the stalwarts of capital. MarsterCard, Visa, and Paypal, where stopped in their tracks by a community influenced by the

 

Evental Aesthetics: Aesthetic Inquiries 4, ISSN: 2167-1931. Submission (2017)

 

 

behaviour of online creativity and it’s circulating images. A fetishism dormant in the movements of a memeiii?

 

The Visual Meme’s (ideas, styles, or behaviours shared within a culture) on the website 4Chan, shows how an image can become a virus, mutating so quickly, that it gave birth to an entirely new culture and community. To understand the relevancy of this to art one could choose to see these changes as what the artist and media theorist Victor Burgin, saw as an ‘absence of presence’. Writing under the same title he explores changes fuelled by postmodernism and conceptual art. Burgin, whilst referencing Michel Foucault’s metaphor of fetishism as ‘capillary action’, and describing Freud’s articulation of fetishism as Disavowal (which is a splitting between knowledge and belief)iv. Seemingly embodied in the then art establishments very relation to history. Yet finding this splitting is very rewarding and should demand that those that are concerned with the openness of art. Need only turn and see new forms of media that have an unequivocal anti-capitalist metabolism. Even Foucault’s metaphorical use of ‘capillary’ lends itself to media art’s virus like body. If you are still doubting the accuracy of the viral narrative one is considering, and how Burgin’s ‘absence of presence’ is relevant.

 

Then look at recent events at the Barbican in London, one exhibition in partnership with Google: ‘Digital Revolution’ (2014). Claiming to be a comprehensive account of digital art: Google’s corporate presence (DevArt) spawned a critical counter exhibition ‘Hack The Art World’ which was a completely digital online exhibition originally geofenced (only available in that location) to the Barbican. It resembled for the art critic Jonathan Jones an exhibition in Paris in 1863, the ‘Salon des Refuses’, showing art rejected by the official Salon. So are these exhibitions and artists demonstrating yet another form of disavowal? Maybe, but the lead artist of the group behind the show Jan Vantomme made a very valid point. When he stated that tech giants should help start legitimising digital artists by buying and collecting their work. The way the art in this show was used directly to illustrate this point should be seen in an extremely positive light. The demand of these artists was legitimate and positioned so as not to detract from the work of the institution. Or from the artists in the physical exhibition, instead it did something more important. It shows that resistance need not be completely dismissive or demand full blown opposition. So another angle, perspective, point of view is necessary to decipher a way in which we can harness these aforementioned antagonisms – the material question is one of dissemination. Like the notion of the meme a one cell thick lining of the capillary, art can now be micro-circulated.

Trapped in a world terraformed by our technology and it’s numerical dominance in data or information. A global conversation contaminated by the axis of encryption/decryption, either infection or defection? One way of framing these issues is brilliantly elaborated in an essay by writer Lori Wike. Wike brings together the thoughts of Jacques Derrida and Roland Barthes on absence, presence, and temporality. In doing so interrogates the link between an image and a word – however it seems that it is actually Barthes words in this text that are more befitting to our contemporary digital creativity, ‘the Photograph mechanically repeats what could never be repeated existentiallyv‘. This statement by Barthes can be witnessed in the blossoming of digital affects, animation, and image manipulation due to computers. Today we unconsciously time travel through a multi dimensional sphere of representations, every single one of them manipulated. A process which is already pre-destined to increase – artists and cultural bodies need not fear these changes. Especially if like Derrida they embrace the affective enthusiasm of their parasitology, their ‘virus being many thingsvi‘.The benefit’s of being prone to infection are like a real immune system, art will develop new forms of isotope ones with an iterability, such precursory examples can be seen in recent projects.

 

‘No Ghost Just a Shell’ (1999) the reanimation of a Japanese anime character by Philippe Parreno and Peirre Huyghe. ‘Low Animal Spirits’ (2014), at Banner Repeater, London. A collaboration resulting in a live algorithmic score derived from the loss of the referent (presence) in both economy and language. Thirdly, ‘Dark Velocity’ (2014) which underlines the main topic that warrants the complex metaphor of this text. Brilliantly summarising, ‘The invariability of contemporary art’s commodity form makes object-ownership hold crucial levering power in the field thereby overshadowing the potential for financial diversificationvii‘. One views the separation between knowledge and belief in psychoanalysis, firmly rooted in the modernist questions of ‘why?’, and ‘how?’. As not entirely outdated in deciphering the above dilemma, the aforementioned overshadowing of diversification, has in this author’s opinion culminated in but one option. Media art and philosophy now have the unenviable task of articulating ‘what?’ and ‘when?’, as questions which will most strongly influence current and future culture. So staying with the letter V as the root linguistic pathogen we can glimpse yet more relations, associations, and paths to discuss. Moreover, art’s complexities will grow with strains and concept’s found in: virtuality, vitalism, and plasticity. Conceptually attaching themselves to the current ‘discipline’ of art’s newest media?

 

‘Discipline is no longer imposed on the body through the formal action of the law – it is printed in the collective brain through the dissemination of techno-linguistic interfaces, inducing a cognitive mutationviii.’

 

What exactly is this mutated cognition, and how does one come to fully appreciate it? Well the first step would be to suggest an event where the mutation is self evident. This would initially be found in a single movement specifically the aesthetic change within cultures of visual production. A transformation from the dominance of montage or collage into the current process of appropriation. This is the physical structure one observes as supporting the notion explored in this text that is the struggle to think through images as viruses, not viral images, but the virus that is an image. Exploring this positive pixel plague there are several artists and thinkers today that have been measuring this idea in a variety of interesting and sometimes semi-conscious ways. But, before referencing these creators one wants to detail the visual experience derived from ‘viral complexities’, and why philosophically speaking they are medicinal for artistic cultures. Earlier, one briefly touched upon some intriguing ideas: ‘absence of presence’, ‘parasitology’, and ‘micro-circulation’. Here Burgin and Derrida present a cloudy aesthetic which could be misconstrued as being contradictory, oppositional, or negative? On the one hand an absence, on the other the more ambiguous presence. In Seeing Sense Burgin solicites a consultation with Sigmund Freud to understand the origin of ‘visual thinking’, and through cigar smoke affirms its biologically older than words. In ‘The Ego and the Id’ Freud suggests that after observing Varendonck’s study of preconscious fantasies, that thinking in pictures is only a very incomplete ‘becoming conscious’, resulting in his question, ‘how we make something that is repressed (pre)conscious would be answered as followsix’. Of course Freud’s answer is ‘analysis’ and is concerned with reaching into the depths of his patient during therapy. However, for the sake of detailing this therapeutic imagitus, Art’s newest infection is not to be found prior to consciousness, rather it is located in its absence? Its possibility?

‘ambition and eroticism here is economically achieved through a pair of substitutions-a ‘v’ for an ‘n’. and a ‘t’ for an ‘r’ – which tacks the manifest verbal text onto its pre-text in the pre-conscious. By this device, the verbal fragment faces onto both manifest and latent contents of the image.x

This pre-textual birth of the virus is visible in the progressive ending of a recent social stigma; AIDS, ‘adding infinite dimensions’ is a nod to the value of experiencing a virus’s transmission. Here one implies that infection, the infectious mysteries of the image have never been nefarious. Simply wishing to allude to this blood disease’s past culture, its stigma, and how it could be both positive, liberating, and negative. Regarding the intentions of this text one does see a precedent in the overly aggressive homophobic reactions to Gay people contained within certain cultures of yesteryear. This word play alludes to this aggressiveness in the socio-visual prejudice against a body with a virus. Instead one catches a glimpse of the contemporary site of the aesthetic experience increasingly contaminating artistic creation today. Therefore, when seeking to make ‘heads or tails’ of the experience of erotic ambitions, Victor Burgin’s text details just how complex the connection between a picture and a plague really is – yet, Burgin only lifts the lid off the sample tube. In the quotation above a section throws doubt toward the notion that images are viruses; how exactly do finite humans breed such a thing, the grandest of infections named art?

Secondly, how is it that one is still grasping for fragments of language when the substitution of v for n (virus for noumena?) provides fuel for an alternative economic achievement? Artists, is it not infuriating? You are all trapped travelling psychoanalytically backwards in a pipette injecting linguistic interpretations onto a surface before consciousness. This dilutes the evidence and the current argument! Technology and it’s material territories behave virally, and art is the virus the object we can encounter. Here is one’s conclusion although the aesthetic experience one is describing has to be better described, and more critical evidence offered up to the reader. Let us look at some art where you can see the virus under its microscope. From the early 1900’s Hiroshi Kawano under the influence of the German thinker Max Bense1 created ‘Digital Mondrians’(1964), followed by Andy Warhol using an Amiga 2000 to digitise his soup cans onto floppy disks (1980’s), and recently the

  • One of the originators for the idea that beauty may be measured scientifically

virus called art has manifested inside the Petri dish where E. coli is the paint for Dr. T. Ryan Gregory2. Experiences with these works are all well and good, but to fully appreciate the event: an encounter with any image and its intrusive politicised ontology, will request the human subject to be comfortable with both being possessed and possessing.

 

Such an ideal would be welcomed if even attainable? Let us focus on ‘possessing’ because that is what images do and are constantly being subjected to … imagine the words of a wealthy collector or informed curator, ‘I’m in possession of an original Mondrian’, and ‘this painting possesses such and such a quality’ are both defunct utterances. Why? Because remember this discussion is exploring the event created by the very real material reality of the visual virus. Hosting the potentials of such an experiential artistic encounter, and its increasingly pertinent presence in the dispersion of new technologies in Art makes one contemplate what kind of laboratories or weather best transmits this pathogenic phenomenon? Today, encountering art as a virus has almost entirely become computational the repercussions of this are difficult to understand. Yet whilst recently reading one of Jacques Rancière’s books this great thinker adds more depth to a seemingly parasitic reality. Disagreeing with Walter Benjamin’s thesis that the mechanical arts of photography and film gave members of the public, the Masses visibility. Rancière demands that through what he calls the Aesthetic Regime of Art there exists a revolutionary kernel inscribed into Aesthetics.

 

‘This programme is literary before being scientific: it shifts the focus from great names and events to the life of the anonymous; it finds symptoms of an epoch, a society, or a civilization in the minute details of ordinary life.xi

 

For so many people ordinary life is programmed in such a way that there is a real threat that art will become auto-immunised, and the experiences available lost behind some unhelpful capitalist protectionism. If one cares about the infectious qualities of new images then referring back to the insights of the exhibition ‘Dark Velocity’ (2014) enables the question: what exactly nullifies the potential for ‘owner-less objects’, and ‘financial diversification’ innate within this primordial power of the artistic virus? How does the artist who sees the aforementioned potentials think through, and resist

the frequent habit of Capitalism to bleach, erase, and develop new anti-art antivirals? The biggest threat to art, its pathogens, and culture is that monetary habits continue to destroy free association and chain libidinal and sexual inhibition to profitability – a kind of, ‘you can have desire, but only through a screen!’ like attitude? Completely shattering the capacity for appreciating there has never been the right to copy, rather it is appropriate to appropriate; do not let the screen take from you! You take from it! Correct? Opting for passive consumption over infection does not bode well, one has to respond to this event, ‘The seductive force of simulation transformed physical forms into vanishing images, submitted visual art to viral spreading,xii’ Perhaps, Post-modernism’s empowerment of surfaces traps the above process on the screen, so eventually the visual event one seeks to detail is deprived of autonomous animation, and its transmission is terminated?

 

Wait, really, how to stop this termination? First, by naming the event under consideration, and protecting it with a clearer definition. Infective Fissures are events that allow for both the artist and the audience to gain a full appreciation of the relations innate to the possessive, or that what possesses? This includes the best articulation of this erotically ambitious economy, ‘When a hypercathexis of the process of thinking takes place, thoughts are actually perceived – as if they come from without and are consequently held to be true.xiii’ But, again does this psychoanalytical obsessiveness, a patient’s hypercathexis, an over investment in an object not present us with the need to libidinously battle against the conservative exclusionary economy. The industry that promotes a possessive obsessive ownership and deletes a sexy creative subjectivity? Therefore when thinking about Infective Fissures it is this synthesis of truth, a synthetic truth, that re-enacts potentials for a new biopolitical understanding of aesthetic experience in these new cybernetic techno-capital spaces. These events are somewhat unpredictable because of the omnipresent systems that violently enforce object ownership. By unpredictable one means that an Infective Fissure has a great potential to disrupt the market dictatorship, and offers very promising future transmutations. However, at the moment these events are too easily uncontaminated. The fate of ‘No Ghost Just A Shell’ (1999) is the best example of the need for communities involved in artistic creation to acquire temporal understanding. If a new way of sharing the rich wealth of possibilities is to appear, it wont be an aggressive territorialization?

‘The legal document which transfers Annlee’s copyright to a foundation That belongs solely to her is, in effect, her death warrant. Paradoxically, it Also gives her her freedom since “The acquisition of ANNLEE is part of an artistic project that consists in liberating a fictional character from the realm of representation.” “Give me liberty and give me death” could be her epitaph. …xiv

In a brilliant review of the exhibition when it visited San Francisco writer Marcia Tanner imbues the Anime character with yet more independence. Completely agreeing with the eulogy; even the art object itself desires death? The demise of an ‘objective dominance’ in the field runs in synchronisation with a whole new generation of image consumption. It is unavoidable the changes wrought by digital technology and an increase in the speed of information have combined to challenge hegemonies. That is why an Infective Fissure is an event, offering a hypercathexical deterritorialization. Always expanding a territory; the virus travels body to body, but it is important to state this does not imply ownership just the expansion of space. Sadly, Peirre Huyghe and Philippe Parreno’s exhibition was an event which ultimately succumbed to the white blood cells of capital’s infrastructure. Initially the project would be fearsomely exemplar of the event one seeks. The purchase of Annlee and her exploitation by other artists was not driven by capital, but by creative contamination. The 428 dollars used to purchase her took into consideration the level of visual detail in her characteristics; the cheapness of the digital file matching the blankness of this material canvas.

 

This is as Tanner writes an exquisite corpse, the shared distribution of unformed matter. Resulting in the creation of identity and value is shared throughout the community’s territory. Unfortunately, this fissure, this event failed and the point of infection was blocked. Institutions and collectors moved in and bought the whole exhibition. At that time Curator Hans Ulrich Obrist saw this as a unique precedent, artists operating against market logic, disseminating/archiving information, and immortalising an undead thing. A communal sign one associates with the kind of solidarity necessary for a mutually possessive event. One in which technology, cognition, and emotion form a macro-biological wonder. Obrist question was this, ‘How can a community constitute itself on the basis of the same sign, identifiable to all, yet peculiar to each person? The first part of the question is good, and useful to understanding Infective Fissures, although penultimately what is ‘peculiar’ to the individual just encourages privatisation in an over confident individualism. Therefore more screens are erected, curtailing growth, and owning – Une mauvaise idée. Okay, if this is a process which destroys this aesthetic event then how is it possible to safeguard it from capitulation? The best way of reading this dilemma arises in a mixture of sources:

 

‘Whatever ultramodernity places under the dominion of signs postmodernity Subverts with virus. As culture migrates into partial-machines (lacking an autonomous reproductive system) semiotics subsides into virotechnics. 001010101101110010110101010100110010001000101010111010000101 01100101001010001100100111001000100000000010011111100010010010101 010100001000010101001111110010010001000110100100010100101011110001 010010000100 0111 … Yes No Yes No Yes Yes No longer what does it mean? but how does it spread?xv

 

‘… ultimately ends up creating a culture stretched between bulimia, steroid overdose, and personal bankruptcy. This perspective—one of more traditional Cultural Studies—views image spam as an instrument of coercive persuasion as well as of insidious seduction, and leads to the oblivious pleasures of surrendering to both.xvi

 

The most radical aspect of the failed Infective Fissure, ‘No Ghost Just A Shell’ (1999-2003) was brought up when Olbrist and Perrano interviewed Jean Claude Ameisen, an immunologist. Ameisen asks, ‘Can something live without death being present?’ a question which really takes the event under scrutiny into confrontation with its postmodern locality. Above, the rouge British thinker Nick Land is first to offer one’s discussion room to find its way. Moreover, the movement of the sign into virotechnics is of the up most importance for this discussion. So, after the stream of binary code Land points us again to the social question: how to transmit, avoid quarantine, and support artistic contamination? The nuances of this question coalesce with media artist, and thinker Hito Steyrel’s words. One translates her aptly named book ‘The Wretched Of The Screen’ (2012) as perhaps the best source to see the problems Infective Fissures encounter as and when they happen. One wonders if she would agree? That even Land’s ‘Hypervirus’ a super addictive art form yet to materialise has to somehow defeat this wretched screen.

 

Speaking about this with a Deluezian accent one becomes aware that instead of enabling the deterritorialization of this event. The screen behaves as a divisive surface inviting a politics of consumption and evaluation, rather than perception. If we delve deeper into Steyrel and Land’s texts we see the problem with more clarity. Currently the artwork and the surfaces it is presented on are still presented as objects in markets. So, artists if they wish to live in a genuinely emancipated society that can regularly experience Infective Fissures. They have to find ways of exercising their agency and assimilating persuasion and seduction outside of ownership. This involves a narrative that has to meander its way around the dehumanising forces of currency internal to postmodernity. Rancière’s notion of revolutionary aesthetics is useful in generating resistance against what Steyrel brilliantly describes: current changes in visual culture. Particularly haunting notions include the ‘poor image’, and the potential for the virus to be mere spam of the earth. Steyrel also has disdain for the sanitising screen, ‘TV has become a medium inextricably linked to the parading and ridiculing of lower classes.xvii’. Polluting the screen with ever more powerful strains of art is her call.

 

One individual that is undoubtedly answering this demand is the American artist Joseph Nechvatal. In a two year period (1991-1993) he pioneered a unique practice that resulted in the creation of an extremely original way of making art. Nechvatal uses his own vocabulary to explain his art. Viractualism is a specific exploration of the interfaces between the technological and the biological. This thinking is strewn throughout this artist’s defining work. In his (2015) exhibition bOdy pandemOnium: Immersion into Noise works on display manipulate these new possibilities and showcases all the revolutionary force of new aesthetics. The reason Nechvatal’s work and Viractualism could be the definitive example of what an Infective Fissure actually resembles. Certain essential qualities are obviously present: 1) the works are collaboratively made with at least one other person. 2) The exhibition features a method that actively embraces the degradation of the image and its information.

Nevertheless, maintaining a critical analysis one has to confess that there is something still missing from this art, that makes me suggest Nechvatal as the artist who next to Philipe Perrano and Peirre Huyghe is thus-far been the closest to realising the event one has attempted to describe. One is sceptical because if you look at Nechvatal’s ‘Viral Venture’ (2011), and his painterly ‘Alife’ method (surely one of the best fusions of programming, animation, virtual reality, and biological simulation?), at no point is the audience/perceiver of this work invited in to participate in the act of creation. One deeply agrees with Nechvatal’s articulation of his creations, ‘art and the history of technology are often marked by ruptures, and most histories overlook moments where “deep fusion” occurs’ and ‘This is important because it represents the seminal function that occurs between the wild real-time and the captured/protected.xix’. Yet, until the audience transforms from passive consumer to active participant, and is invited as co-author into the moment of creation. This event will remain marginal meaning one has been thinking through an event of the near future. A future where more and more people are free to engage with art because the world has accepted universal income in response to the continued debilitating qualities of grossly unequal financial ideologies.

Infective Fissures may be happening now in the creative practices of the younger generations, the teens that are so accustomed to lightning fast communication will welcome market diversification. For this progression to happen the current impetus has to be on stressing the importance of the virus itself? What one desires to stress is that the current phenomena so visible is that ‘appropriation’ is an undead replication of non living things. Resulting in the necessity of fully promoting just how radical this change could be? If one needs even more intellectual evidence? More deconstruction of the concepts at stake then one points you to Jacques Derrida’s idea of a dissimulated contamination, and William S. Burroughs’s ‘The Electronic Revolution’ (1970), both suffice to deepen the profile of the virus and the event which enables its encounter. As Burrough’s explains quoting a scientist by the name of Mr. Wilson Smith.

 

‘Viruses are obligatory cellular parasites and are thus wholly dependant upon the integrity of the cellular systems they parasitize for their survival in an active state. It is something of a paradox that many viruses ultimately destroy the cells in which they are living…xx

 

It is not that paradoxical anymore! The destruction at the cellular level took place in the relentless march of science and its technologies. Whereas it is a shame that it was not the coin instead of the cell? Joining these two realisations together creates an Infective Fissure; if, and only if humans embrace certain facts. Hidden inside our creative economy is a need not to repress sexuality, and at the same time master it?

Because the very same forces involved in successful reproduction are both controlling and liberating. Humorously the initials of one’s theoretical event combine to suggest a type of artistic infertility treatment? But, this is overdoing it and far from being unrealistic Infective Fissures are events that are not only set to increase. Moreover, as more and more of us become radically unhappy with a revolting pictorial reality again portrayed by Steyrel, ‘According to the pictures dispersed via image spam, humanity consists of scantily dressed degree-holders with jolly smiles enhanced by orth-odontic braces.xxi’. People will continue to succumb to the market’s overly monopolising malware. Unless the event called an I.F and those experiencing it cultivates a more confident relation to what Derrida acknowledged as παρασιτος (Parasitos), or always eating at the table of anotherxxii. Next to behaviour Nick Land clearly observed in the computational schizo-creation, called hypervirus, ‘yes yes no yes no nomadically abstracting its processes from specific media (DNA, words, symbolic models, bit-sequences), and operantly re-engineering itself… ROM is melted into recursive experimentationxxiii.’ If this clear structural evidence in support of Infective Fissures is not algorithmically acceptable, then putting it simply: the browser will close, and the event will be thrown in the trash bin of theory. Hopefully after reading this PET scan of an essay you also wish to experience an I.F, and come to agree with one’s belief. It is not that art should be like a virus, the understanding rests in appreciating it exists as a virus. Please, brace yourself for your next infection? Seek it out, share, and rejoice in the free contamination?3


  • I wanted to add sentences about Stuxnetthe weaponised computer virus that shut down Iran’s nuclear facilities in 2010. It is unavoidable, that we play with words: ‘Politically we need this virus lest we be just rendered useless fearing power and just stuck on a nuclear net! The work of Hannah Perry, her recent exhibition ‘Viruses Worth Spreading’ at Arsenal Contemporary, in New York could also if it had slightly more collaborative distribution, and less commercial aspects serve as an example of an Infective Fissure.
  • Edgor Kraft, Virtual Amplification, Personal Project, Video Loop, 01:20, (2011) <https://vimeo.com/23609366&gt; [accessed 26th October 2014]
  • Rod Stoneman, Seeing Is Believing: The Politics Of The Visual – Recycled Electrons, Black Dog Publishing, London, p.169, (2013)
  • Brian Knappenberger, We Are Legion: The Story Of Hacktivist’s, Documentary Film, Luminant Films, (2012)
  • Victor Burgin, The Absence Of Presence, 1965 to 1972 – When Attitudes Became Form, Kettle’s Yard Gallery, Cambridge, & Edinbrugh, p.17-24, (1984) [Art In Theory 1900 – 2000: An Anthology Of Changing Ideas, Blackwell Publishing, USA, p.1071, (2003)]

 

  • Lori Wike,   Photographs And Signatures: Absence, Presence, and Temporality In Barthes And

Derrida, In[]visible Culture: An Electronic Journal For Visual Studies, Rochester.edu, (2000) <http://www.rochester.edu/in_visible_culture/issue3/wike.htm>%5Baccessed 2nd November 2014]

 

volatility/> [accessed 2nd November 2014]

viiiFranco Berardi (Bifo), Proliferating Futures, Vol 1 #4, Winter/Spring (1996) [Proud To Be Flesh:, Mute Publishing/Autonomedia, London/New York, p.41, (2009)

 

  • Sigmund Freud, The Ego And The Id,The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volume XIX (1923-1925): The Ego and the Id and Other Works, 1-66.

 

  • ( 1923 Das Ich Und Das Es,Leipzig, Vienna and Zurich: Internationaler Psycho-analytischer Verlag. Pp. 77.)
  • Victor Burgin, The End of Art Theory: Criticism and Postmodernity; Seeing Sense,Macmillan, (1986) pg60- 61
  • Jacques Rancière, trans. Gabriel Rockhill,The Politics of The Aesthetics: The Distribution of TheSensible, Continuum, New York (2004) pg32
  • Hito Steyrel, The Wretched of the Screen,E-flux Journal, Sternberg Press, Berlin, (2012) pg.10
  • Viro de Graphe-Matician, On Jacques Derrida’s Parasitology,February 8, (2011) <https://virographematics.wordpress.com/2011/02/08/parasite-auto-immunity-jacques-derrida/>%5Baccessed 10th August 2017]
  • Marcia Tanner, Requiem for a Mail Order Bride (Review of Pierre Huyghe and Philippe Parreno’s‘No Ghost Just a Shell’ San Francisco Museum of Modern Art December 14, 2002) Stretcher, Online Magazine, <http://www.stretcher.org/features/no_ghost_just_a_shell/&gt;{Accessed 12/08/2017}
  • Nick Land. Ed, Robin Mackay & Ray Brassier, Fanged Noumena: Collected Writings 1987-2007; Hypervirus, Urbanomic, Sequence Press, London/New York (2012), pg383
  • Hito Steyrel, The Wretched of the Screen, pg162.
  • William S. Burroughs, The Electronic Revolution,Ubuclassics, (2005), originally published by Expanded Media Editions (1970)
  • Hito Steyrel, The Wretched of the Screen, pg162.
  • Land. Pg 386

Interactivity and Animation

Interactivity and Animation: Recent Developments in Motion Design

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Designing motion is a really interesting thing humans are both capable and incapable of doing it. Moving away from the idea that motion is the sign of life; from the unmoved mover (Aristotle’s god) to our daily experience of consuming oxygen and producing carbon dioxide we are capable of manipulating our directions and the forms which inform our motion. This is the purpose of this post to provide a brief insight into artists that are providing an opportunity to study and look at the space occupied by interactivity and animation. So, we may appreciate their presence and prescience. Studying and learning from their great examples together. […]

# Matthew Williamson

I went to art school with this mad South African animator. When we were studying at Sheffield Hallam University Mathew was interested in sound and experimented extensively with this medium; his degree show exhibition was a soundscape of considerable depth. I am not sure about other influences, but I am sure he may agree with me when I say that it was not only the awesome presence of Chris Cunningham, Warp records, and Aphex Twin that influenced Williamson’s progression. His extensive use of computers to create striking imagery surely must reference the machines which invite talented individuals like Mathew to express themselves to the best of their creative abilities. There was a particular moment that I realised Mathew’s work had taken a leap up to the next level when he made an animation installation for Sheffield’s festival of mind. This Installation was projection mapped onto a curved surface and although I was not there to see this in person the image of it struck me as a moment where Matt realised the full extent of his digital potentials. Since then he has been busy living up to that potentiality recently completing work for the newest series of Doctor Who. Below, are screen shots of said Dr.Who work and other visuals stolen from his instagram you should follow him @mattwilliamsonav. You should also tune into his streaming channel and get zapped by the current. https://m.twitch.tv/mattwilliamson

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# Universal Everything

Another resident from that urban urspring of English creativity called Sheffield. Universal Everything is the baby of a certain Matt Pyke. Completing his education in Portsmouth and London he is arguably director of the most prominent and innovative team of motion designers currently swimming around the multi-verse. For a good idea of this creative characters background and person read an interview with him here >>>. Of course you should have already visited their awesome website and gawped at the magic they have drawn into existence. Below, are a few of my favorite examples of this everything which would be universal. The name is evocative and shoves the problematic presence of animation right to the edge of your eye. I will ignore the interpretation or perspective of this studio’s name that is suggestive of an easy relation to capital, ‘if everything is universal, including ourselves, then we can do everything’ – nothing is out of bounds and of course in this case although they cultivate commercial relationships with the worlds biggest companies and therefore supportive of monetary ideology; as long as we are gifted such visual wonders then perhaps we may ignore the hidden flux of finance that powers such innovations. No, not ignore, just be grateful that this group of creators are creating with such ferocity. Also, it is very much a group and this collaborative part is important: Universal Everything could be a precedent for what creatives or human creativity should achieve in the expected third industrial revolution where social networks merge with new technological spaces to produce an entirely new economy.

I really love all their images but the moving images that feature and ask the question about the relation between the organic and machine are mesmerizing. Tribes makes me think of the Anthropocene and the vast size and difficulty of providing an image that is truly applicable to all humans and their behaviour. For the next few years I hope to study language and animation so the work OFFF, a series of hybrid typographic-architecture prototypes is well lodged in my memory and has an immediate association and affinity with the architectural practice of Eniatype.  

# Ryoji Ikeda

A Japanese sound artist who is completely subdued and is continuously seducing with his mathematically inspired work. Ikeda’s work is very Japanese and he has earned his reputation through a unique blending of number and minimal components of sound. Sine waves, bass, sub bass, pitch, blips, high hats, samples, white noise, sets, sub-sets, dots, dashes, equivalences, riddims, horns, digits, bits, and much more could be wielded by this great Asian alchemist. Sound is interesting because of its ontological diversity it exists but so ephemerally and this trace like structure makes us think of the quantum physics that suggests waves comprise the inner workings of physical matter. But, this idea from physics does not portray the whole story with the exact standards of science and therefore Ikeda’s work achieves something remarkable and transforms or should I say animates the physical innards of sound into images. Doing so in such a natural way that his installations often seem to be revealing the workings of the contemporary technology driving the processes that have exploded and will explode even more in the coming decades. I am suggesting that Ikeda-san has really dug deep into sounds unique matter and discovered its affinity with math. I like his work because it has that Japanese aesthetic that we all love and it makes me think of the dynamism and dualism of theories that originate in the original attempts to ground/ discover the source of mathematics. I understand that in the history of this kind of thinking there are two Set theory, and Mereology. The first discusses and determines collections of objects and the extent to which number supports said collections, the second is the study of parts and wholes, and I think that Ikeda’s art invites much more inquiry into these matters. Please enjoy these samples of his work below.

1262156_135350_ryoji-ikeda

# Team Lab

Are Team Lab Japan’s answer to Universal Everything? I do not think so they are a team of creatives equally matched to deliver moments of animated audacity. Only team lab seems much more concerned with reproducing nature as we experience it naturally and I think this is a running theme throughout their work – after all they are Japanese. Japans relationship with wave forms is well documented from the Hokusai’s ‘Giant Wave’ 神奈川 Kanagawa-oki nami ura and through Asia’s dominant traditional writing style. The calligraphic strokes of Black ink seem to effortlessly harness the force of liquid lines. What I find most interesting about Team Lab is and other creative entities like them is their commitment to shared processes of creativity. In their video works interactivity is blended with floor to ceiling projections to provide an immersive experience. Some of their installations follow the cultural practice of wrapping; the Japanese delight in the representation of things so a precious yet transient equality is maintained. With both the representation and its content bask in the shared ease at which they are transmitted to a perpetually increasing fan base. Here it is necessary to pay Team Lab a great compliment in their own language. Their art is a quintessential visual practice in which they provide memories as a Furoshiki風呂敷 (Thanking present) or as a continuation of Giri 義理 (Gift giving). So I compel you to enjoy these Japanese gift givers. The work below is from the groups exhibition in California, Continuous Life and Death – enjoy

# Evan Roth

An American artist widely acknowledged as an influential contributor to the new artistic domains of the 21st century. Roth can be easily seen as a front runner and already a great influence on artists seeking to use technology in there work. Roth is also a co-founder of the awesome Graffitti Research Lab, and the Free Art and Technology Lab both influential groups expanding into new spaces and potentialities of visual networked communication. The recent aesthetic of his work is very bloody I like the red of these works: Internet Landscapes (2016), a body of work that explores the artists experience of traveling Sweden searching for the physicality of the Internet. The press release from collect the WWWorld. Exhibition (2011) describes this newish realm of creativity,’to demonstrate how the Internet generation is implementing and developing a practice started in the Sixties by Conceptual Art, and further developed in subsequent decades in the forms of Appropriation Art and post-production: the practice of exploring, collecting, archiving, manipulating and reusing huge amounts of visual material produced by popular culture and advertising.’ really simplifies the climate of the last 8 years. Roth in many ways is a fine example of a creator who is well positioned to make good use of the new technologies such as quantum computing and developments in the internet as it grows and changes.

evan_roth_ljus_er-med  2-1

# Rose Butler

Rose Butler primarily works in moving image and video and is a very respected teacher and researcher (again in that beautiful place called Sheffield). A handful of her work makes use of interactivity where the observers of her work are considered as active components. The first example being Butler’s collaboration and commission  for FACT in the UK. This work was perhaps the first time this artist worked with the concept of surveillance; in this case pedestrians and members of the public were recorded going about their daily business and often shocked to see themselves on the big screen. An art installation that simultaneously explores the bigness of screens and how we are now watched and/or watching? Other works and exhibitions that include interaction are Stall, Barnsley (2005) featuring a reproduction of a market stall and then an interactive animation in which due to a loop in the recording participants can re-visit their initial visit to the market therefore offering a commentary and experience on the changing economic structure of markets. Again click on Rose’s Hashtagged name  to see more of her work.

Sai Tamiya / タミヤ・サイ

 

03

タミヤ・サイ /  Sai Tamiya,

私は君の絵とイラストレーションが本当に素敵ですのでもっと習いたいだから、もし、今月から三ヶ月まで君のお仕事を私とインタビューで話したら、本当にいいです。このアートはどう描けますか。絵は、マジックとみたいですけど、実君のタレントで、良い日本ので野党的な版画家と耽美を続ける事から現在世界に持って来ます…もっと当世流なし方です。

I think your illustrations are amazing and I want to learn more about them so it would be really good if over the next couple of months you would be willing to engage in an interview with me about your art and illustration practice. How you started making the images you make? Images, that somehow as if by magic, but really by your talent, carry and transform the rich tradition of Japanese printmaking and aesthetics and really brings it into the contemporary world – in a more modern way.

その絵は肝心の日本的なスタイル有りますから皆さんが見えなければなりません…

I would like to help promote your work… because your images contain an essential Japanese style that everyone should see.
ポール・ハリソン  (歩流・梁尊)

Paul Harrison

 

 

ポール ハリソンさん

 

メールをどうもありがとうございました。

ポールさんが私のイラストレーションを気に入ってくれて、私も嬉しいです。

 

Thank you for your email.

I’m glad that you liked my illustration.

 

まず始めに申し上げますと、私の作品はCGであって、リアルの版画ではありません。私は日本画や版画が好きですが、本の挿絵などの仕事として制作するには、岩絵の具や墨を使って描くことは、時間的にもコスト的にも現実的ではないからです。だから私はペンタブレットを使って、なるべくリアルの日本画や版画に見えるように描いています。

 

First of all, my work is CG, not real wood prints. I like Japanese paintings and wood prints. But it is not realistic in terms of time or cost to draw drawings using rock paints or inks. So I use a pen tablet to draw as realistic Japanese paintings and wood prints as possible.

 

使用しているアプリケーションはPainterとPhotoshopの2つで、ペンタブレットを使っています。人物や背景などのアウトラインをPainterで描き、Photoshopで色を塗っています。そして、リアルな版画や日本画の質感を出すために、スキャナーで取り込んだ紙のテクスチャーを

レイヤーで重ねて、最後に色の調整をして完成です。

簡単に説明するとこのような工程です。

 

I mainly use Painter, Photoshop and a pen tablet.

Draw outlines such as people and background with Painter and paint colors with Photoshop. Then, to lay out realistic prints and textures of Japanese paintings, layer the paper texture captured by the scanner.

Finally, color adjustment is done and it is completion.

田宮

Best regards, Sai

 

 

2018年半にブログのポストから私たちは一緒に喋る事が大好きです。是非、1つのエメールで2つの質問をしましょう。色々なトッピクので君のワークから、日本と世界も。

I would really love to interview you over the second half of 2018 for a blog post. Let us email each other with two questions each email. About all kinds of topics that relate to your work, Japan, and the wider world.

 

ここにまずの2つの質問です

Here are the first two questions:

 

一    墨絵と木版よりデジタルなソフトの方が好きです。あのー君はこの働き方の現実化時が説明を出来ませんか。

1) You use digital software rather than the older woodblock printing. Can you describe to me the moment you realized that this way of working was the best for you?

 

二    雪舟・等楊さんのアートが大好きとブァン・ゴーは墨絵ので大きく影響しました。君ために外人で誰がインスパイアしませんか。

2) I love the work of Sesshū Tōyō and the fact that Van gogh collected Japanese wood block prints. Are there any western artists that influence you?

 

(この返事は遅過ぎたのでごめんなさいです。最近、いつも忙しかったです。)じゃ、来年私はまた東京に来るから、その時に私たちを1回目会えます。良い友達をなる。

(I am sorry this reply is late, I am always too busy…) I am planning on visiting Tokyo next year so after our discussion we will become friends in person…

 

Paul ポール。(歩流・梁尊)

 

こんにちは、ポールさん。

 

インタビューに関してのご返信です。

私は英語が上手じゃないので、あなたにうまく伝われば良いのですが。

 

1

私は最初はアクリル絵の具を使っていましたが、

私がイラストレーターとして仕事をし始めた1996年頃に、デジタルイラストレーションが世に出始めて私もMackintoshとFractal Design Painterを使い始めました。デジタルではペンタブレットを使って手書きのように描かくことができ、色の調整や編集が容易であることそして、その頃から出版業界でも次第にフロッピーディスクによるデータ入稿が主流になったのも、私がデジタルソフトウェアを使い始めた一因です。

1

At first I was using acrylic paint, about 1996 when I began working as an illustrator, digital illustration started to appear in the world and I started using Mackintosh and Fractal Design Painter.In digital, you can paint like a handwriting using a pen tablet, it is easy to adjust and edit colors.

And from that time on, the publishing industry gradually became the mainstream of submission of data by floppy disk.

That is one reason I began using digital software.

 

2

私は学生の頃は油絵を描いていて、ゴッホも私が好きな画家の一人です。

私は西洋のテンペラ画がの色合いや質感が好きで、Sandro BotticelliやFra Filippo Lippiをよく参考にしました。私がデジタルで描き始めた頃、私はテンペラ画の質感を表現するために色々なマチエールを作り、それらをスキャンしてイラストレーションに使いました。その手法は今でも使っています。

2

I was drawing oil painting when I was a high school student and Van Gogh is one of my favorite painters. I like the color and texture of western tempera paintings, especially Sandro Botticelli and Fra Filippo Lippi. When I began to draw in digital, I made various material to express texture of tempela picture, scanned them and used it for illustration. I still use that method.

ポールさんが来年東京に来た時はもし会えれば良いですね

It would be nice to meet you when you came to Japan next year.

 

 

  1. You have had a lot of success with your style. I really think that works like: ‘man with carp’ , and ‘the Girl with an umbrella’ are not too idealised or realistic but achieve a great blend between the two. [I am not sure of these titles are correct, but your instagram account provides a great overview], then you also have deeply erotic illustrations. I wanted to ask you two questions: 1) Which Japanese artist working with eroticism do you like? 2) Do you think works that are erotic in some way are more subjective than objective? Because sex can be thought of in many different ways?

 

  1. 君のスタイルと盛況をくれました。私は絵から, ‘男性と鯉’と’彼女と傘’が理想家と現実的を過ぎるじゃないので良いブレンドをしました。(多分、タイトルは正しくないです。分からない…) そして、深くて色っぽい絵も有るから、2つの質問を尋ねたいです。一、誰の色っぽい画家が好きですか。二、サイくんは色っぽいアートをもっと主観的か客観的でどう思いますか。セクスは色々な考え方を有ろう。

 

02

man with carp

 

ポール ハリソンさん

 

こんにちは。

日本では8月は酷暑でしたが、9月になり涼しくなってきました。

そちらは日本よりだいぶ涼しいでしょうね。

 

大学で2つの試験したからこの返事は遅過ぎましたので本当にごめんなさいです。全然問題ないですよ。

 

3

>1)Which Japanese artist working with eroticism do you like?

 

彼らはエロチズムを描くアーティストではないかも知れませんが、私は林静一や小村雪岱が好きです。(一応、彼らはヌードも描きます)

林静一は私が子供の頃の1970~1980年代に挿絵だけでなく様々なメディアで活躍したイラストレーターです。彼の描く女性はどこか物憂いな雰囲気でとても魅力的です。小村雪岱は80年以上前のアーティストです。

彼の描くイラストはシンプルながら構図が洗練されていて、物語性を感じさせます。それは浮世絵のようで浮世絵ではない、古いようで新しいスタイルです。

 

>2) Do you think works that are erotic in some way are more subjective than objective? Because sex can be thought of in many different ways?

 

それは場合によって違うのでどちらとも言えますが、仕事で描いているものは客観的なものですね。小説の挿絵などは読者が物語のシーンを想像する手助けをするためのものですから、登場人物や情景、時代背景至るまで、私は出来るだけ物語に忠実に挿絵を描いています。

 

 

3

1) Which Japanese artist working with eroticism do you like?

 

They may not be an artist who draws erotism, but I like Seiichi Hayashi and Komura Settai.(They also draw nudity)Hayashi Shiichi is an illustrator who played an active part in various media in the 1970-1980 years, and the woman he draws is very attractive with its annui atmosphere. Komura Settai is an artist over 80 years ago. Although his illustrations are simple, the composition is refined and makes it feel narrative. It seems to be an ukiyoe print, not an ukiyo-e, it seems old and a new style.

 

2) Do you think works that are erotic in some way are more subjective than objective? Because sex can be thought of in many different ways?

 

Since it depends on the case, it can say either, but what you are painting at work is objective. Illustrations of novels are for helping readers imagine the story scenes,I draw illustrations faithfully to the story as much as possible, from characters, scenes, to the background of the times.

 

 

Best regards

 

Sai

 

 

四つと五つと六つの質問しましょう。

 

The 4th, 5th, 6th questions…

 

四・サイさんの全ての絵からどちら一番大好きですか。そして、理由は何ですか。

  1. Sai, in all your images which one do you like the most?

 

五・日本は有名な芸者いるので最近この文化は退行とみたいですけど、いつか普通の日本の女性は着物を着ったら�芸者もみたいです。芸者のでサイさんの意見は?

  1. Geisha are famous in Japan, recently thisCulture is regressing but sometime a normal Japanese woman wears the kimono and seems like a Geisha. Sai, what is your opinion on this?

 

六・最近私の同僚はおススメしました。本の作家が、『ユキオ・みしま、仮面の告白』です。そして、私はアニメが好きだから、どちらアニメが好きですか。例えば、鋼の錬金術…

  1. Recently a colleague of mine made a recommendation. An author of a book, ‘Yukio Mishima, “Confessions of a Mask”. And, I like anime, which anime do you like? For example, “Hagenenorenkinjitsu”…

 

SAI, I will send you some more questions soon… もうすぐ、多分もっと三個の質問を送っています。じゃ、元気だね…

 

歩流…

 

ポール ハリソンさん

 

こんにちは。

先日のインタビューの返信です。

 

4

最近描いた絵の中では「祭りのあと」が好きです。

理由は人物の表情と構図でしょうか。縁日から帰ってきて少し寂しい雰囲気が表現できたと思います。

 

I like “after the festival” in the paintings I drew recently.

The reason is the expression and composition of the person.

I think I was able to express a little lonely atmosphere as she came back from the shrine festival.

 

 

01

The Girl with an umbrella

 

5

日本では現在でもお祭りで浴衣を着たり、成人式などで着物を着ますが、

芸者は宴会などで客を楽しませる技能を持ったホステスのことなので、日本人の私には着物を着ている女性と芸者は全く別に見えますね。

私は着物が普段着のようにもっとポピュラーなものになってほしいです。

 

In Japan, I still wear a yukata at a festival and wear kimonos at an adult ceremony etc, In general, geisha is a hostess with skills to entertain customers at banquets and the like,a woman wearing a kimono and a geisha are quite different to me in Japanese. I want kimono to become more popular like everyday wear.

 

6

私は最近のアニメはあまり見ませんが、私が子供の頃によく見たのは世界名作劇場と呼ばれるシリーズです。どの物語も好きですが、その中でも特に「赤毛のアン」が好きです。

 

I don’t see much of recent animation, but I often see it when I was a child is a series called “World Masterpiece Theater”. I like all the stories, but I especially like “Anne of Green Gables” among them.

Best regards

Sai

 

オケー、終わるの四つの質問です。(私たちは忙しい人ので僕に悲しさを成るですけど会えるでこの話すを続けている) そして、君の答えが好きです。私は多くて新しい事を習います。

Okay, four last questions (It makes me sad but we are both busy and can continue our conversations in person), and I like your answers. I am learning many new things.

 

七ー    日本でスタジオジブリのテーマパークを開ける事が楽しみにしますか。行きませんか。ディズニーランドも有るととても人気なー。

  1. Are you looking forward to the Ghibli Theme park opening? Will you go? Japan has Disneyland and it is very popular.

 

八ー     音楽は話しません。ゴールデンボンバーよりBABY METALどちらが好きですか。どちら聞きたいですか。

  1. We haven’t discussed music. Which one do you prefer? Golden Bomberor Baby Metal? Which will you listen to?

 

九ー   私はタオ・オカモトさんが敬愛します。この彼女は映画にザー ウルバリーンで見えました。誰かが好きですか。

  1. I have a crush on the actress Tao Okamoto. I saw her in the film ‘The Wolverine’ (2013). Is there someone who you admire?

十ー    しまいに世界に将来お仕事を説明しで下さい。何の君のアートの展覧会が皆さんは楽しみにします。

  1. Finally, please tell the world what work you have planned for the near future. What exhibitions of your work can we look forward to?

 

 

ポール ハリソンさん

こんにちは。インタビューの返信です。

 

私は宮崎駿のファンなのでジブリパークの開園は楽しみですね。

私はジブリの映画の中ではとなりのトトロが好きなのですが、

私が大学生時代に住んでいた所沢は”となりのトトロ”の舞台でもあって、郊外には今でもトトロの森があります。

映画の舞台になった街を散策するのも良いです。

 

I’m a fan of Hayao Miyazaki, I am looking forward to the opening of Ghibli Park.

I like “My neighbor Totoro” in Ghibli’s movies, Tokorozawa I lived in college days is also the stage of “Totoro”,

there are still Totoro’s forests in the suburbs.

It is good to take a stroll around the city where the movie was set.

 

残念ながら私はどちらのアーティストの音楽も聴かないです。

私がよく聴くのは1970~80年代の音楽で、ディスコやファンクが特に好きです。洋楽ではEarth, Wind & Fire、邦楽では山下達郎が好きで、最近は80年代の日本のシティポップスをよく聴きます。

 

Unfortunately I don’t hear either.

I often listen to music in the ‘70s and ’80s, especially like disco and funk.

I like Earth, Wind & Fire in Western music, and Tatsuro Yamashita in Japanese music. Recently I listen to Japanese popular city pop in the 80’s.

 

私はマイケル・J・フォックスが大好きです。彼の映画では”バック・トゥ・ザ・フューチャーが”有名ですが、The Secret of My Successも私の大好きな映画です。

I love Michael J. Fox. In his movie “Back to the Future” is famous, “The Secret of My Success” is also my favorite movie.

 

10

私は現在は書籍の挿絵やブックカバーを主に描いていますが、将来的には私はその他のメディアでの仕事も増やしていきたいです。

私のイラストレーションは日本画のような日本スタイルの描き方をしているので、私は海外での仕事でもそれを活かせるようにしたいです。

 

Currently I mainly draw illustrations of books and book covers, but in the future

I would like to increase the work on other media as well.

As my illustration is drawing Japanese style like Japanese paintings, I would like to make use of it even in overseas work.

イラストレーションを添付します。 インタビューをどうもありがとうございました。

Best regards

 

 

タミヤ・サイはフリーランスの挿絵画家(イラストレーター)です。彼は東京・日本に住んでいます。

Sai Tamiya is a freelance Illustrator who lives and works in Tokyo Japan. See the illustrations at: http://www.artlimited.net/14860 and on Instagram: @saitamiya